Crash

Created and Performed by Pamela Mala Sinha

Directed by Alan Dilworth

Like our last play, 887, this play is about a memory, but it could not be more different.

887 was personal and political, but positive and happy.

Crash is also personal, but so intense that I hope it was written from the imagination and not from a real experience. Rape and the memory of rape and post rape behaviour have been much discussed in the last year, but I have never seen such a graphic  presentation of the after effects of a brutal assault on the woman and on those who love her.

Sinha presented this story in a calm and poetic manner, gradually revealing the horrific details. Never too much at once, or we would not have been able to bear it. Her performance was outstanding. The play was gripping and exhausting. I was glad we had to walk home afterwards as I needed the exercise to calm down.

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About cathyriggall

Theatre junkie, who thinks live theatre is the ultimate form of living on the edge. You never know what will happen when an actor steps on the stage.
This entry was posted in Soulpepper 2017, Uncategorized and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Crash

  1. keithhpotter says:

    Okay, so we are doing rape this week: we read the Wife of Bath’s Tale in our Canterbury Tales course, we started watching the third season of Broadchurch and we saw Crash.

    “The Girl”‘s memories of her rape by a taxi driver and of her father’s death (at his funeral?) as she deals with her guilt for not fighting and not being able to remember her attacker is presented in fragments of monologue and dance on a nearly bare stage. Sinha’s performance is gripping, and rather devastating.

    Kimberly Purtell also deserves a shout-out for the lighting design that helped present the story on that nearly empty stage.

    Great production – but I need something lighter and more cheerful next.

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